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20121224
20121224
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of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be because it has been a good year. as audrey suggests i believe that is because of partnership is up. we want to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions
of the acknowledgments on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend b
underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we started on this proje
francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of truste
across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets th
determined in the city that this legislation is good -- good legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now that said, i get a fair number of petitions and appeals to me. typically, they are from the neighbors. i want to see that there is actually a practical problem posed -- that the condition is there to solve, not that this is the way the things have been or maybe there's someone who is satisfied by what is potentially wrought by having live entertainment. it is alw
. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it has a beautiful red rock formations. you could watch the sunrise over the bay. this is another one of our great lookouts. we are at mount davidson. 928 feet. this is the place for you to bring someone special. to not forget that dogs and enjoy all of the pathways and greenery that surrounds you. it provides a peaceful oasis of open space and great hiking trails. the spectacular view offers a perfect place to watch the sunrise or sunset with someone you love. >> it is a good place to get away fro
building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million pe
to call out the other important partners, city college of san francisco, public health and san francisco public health, the metropolitan transportation authority and parks and recs and the boys and girls club among others to deliver the opportunities and services. at the out set what i also wanted to say and i was taken by henry's comments so i diverted a lot but i wanted to say how pleased i am here to join the mayor and the supervisor and the house leader pelosi, representatives here from the two neighborhoods and others, and really to say that, and i think henry you talked about the mayor's leadership here and really about the vision of transforming our housing, improving schools and supporting economic development that these are the most effective when the public and the private institutions work together and break down barriers and cut through the red tape and thank you very much for your leadership. [applause] so choice neighborhoods is just one powerful example of the obama administration investing better and we do what works and stop what doesn't work and form the partnerships t
with an enlightened church. the killing in kansas city, a football player, his wife and himself. three or 4 nfl players say they carry a gun and with basketball players the same. somewhere we're sitting around watching san francisco play miami excited who will win that game. of the tens of thousands that watch those games those role models on the field are not ministers. those athletes have a role to play in diffusing this crisis in our culture. those that do music and art and attract by the thousands. we pay to hear them sing and watch them perform. they must lift their art above deck dance and inspire and something blowing in the wind and can't recycle our worse fears. our nation has become much too violent. we're the most violent nation on earth. we make of the most guns and we shoot them. we make the most bombs and we drop them. in this state unions larger than the teacher union and building first class jails and second class schools and [inaudible] stop the problem. each out and convene the family is the first step in the right direction. mr. mayor at this table must be disk joc
, and a donation in the city hall when you have to visit, we have canisters for those who need food for this season, also if you would join us in the weekend of december 15th and 16th, we are going to have family orientation outside with snow day here in city hall. we are bringing snow in again. and we are going to enjoy this with our snow day, december 15th and 16th, you are all welcome to come and bring the kids and all of the extended families. and if i may say again, these holidays and what the tree represent is the best hope and wishes. the holidays should never be about ourselves. what reminds us and what this tree will continue doing, is that you have to remember others that are less fortunate, and share our hearts and our minds and our resources with them. and it is just like japan, for what they have done. if you read the papers recently, you know, that japan suffered a very harsh earthquake and tsunami a while back. and they could have easily said, that we are victims of a national disaster. but, when the country heard that the debris was crossing international lines, all the way to the w
. good afternoon everyone. welcome to city hall. it's my honor and pleasure to welcome all of you here on this reflection and celebration event, and just wanted to make sure you knew that when we were talking about this with abbey shortly after milton's passing away we thought it was a great opportunity for those that knew milton, knew his personality and engaged himself with him and his family over the many years want i find it appropriate of the families -- i am thankful abbey you and the kids agreed this is appropriate for milton and for our memories. i want to express not only our heart felt appreciation for milton's work and our sadness of losing him, but there's so many things in his life to celebrate, and i know milton way back when i started working in the city, and he came forth and said "by the way -- introduced himself as the son and carolene and the senior marks and said "we have something in common" and" what's that?" and we both went to bowdoin college and we are boft west coast guys and had friends and how did we end up at bowdoin college in maine and as we shared the
the events that you have been to in the city hall in this one rotunda or one of the offices and so many wonderful weddings and so many celebrations and so many heart rending speeches and yes, some sad occasions too. all a part of our community and our beautiful city. as you look around this room tonight, what a diverse combination we have. it makes me smile, but it probably doesn't make nebraska smile. we live in a richly diverse city and our elected officials represent it and our events here represent it and the tree lighting should represent it and indeed it does, we call it the tree of hope. and every year we get messages from all over the country and all over the world that are put on origamis and put on this very unique, unusual tree. >> there are many cities that have holiday trees, but no one has the tree of hope. it was started by an organization and now i will have the chance to introduce you to that organization's founder and executive director. who failed to put this in the proper amount of type here. no little things happen. the sound is better, i think that you can hear and
did have fun, but he trownsed most of the city that year in voter turnout. since most of my political focus is education and children i'm not someone you should ask to run your campaign lightly. i think henny will tell you that. i will vet you intensely and get in your face, and i will question your beliefs, and i want to make sure you're serious about service in education, and it's funny as milton was he was very serious about service to his city. for some people the call to politics is great. for some it is ego or path to money or power or corruption. some people are called to politics for service, and the political arena it's hard to know a person's calling. in milton's case it was his genetic makeup. it was his everyday. it was as much a part of him as his receding hair line. his great love and commitment to making city college a fine institution for every person in our city was part of his circulatory system, and yes he was a politician, and a fine one at that, but his calling was better serve the future of san francisco to save our institutions for his children and our ch
narrator: las vegas is one of the fast-growing areas in the country. it's a relatively new city under constant construction. but because it's in the arid mojave desert, the challenge of las vegas is supply. woman: all the growth and everything that's occurred in southern nevada has been with colorado river water. without it, the west as you know it today couldn't exist. narrator: to sustain their growing community with its limited supply, las vegas learned to be extremely efficient. mulroy: this is a desert, and it has its own beauty, but you have to get beyond what you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants,
rocking san francisco city hall indian way. how about a big round of applause for all our dancers? all right. [applause] all right. once again let's hear it for your singers, our dancers from everywhere here in the san francisco bay area. [applause] all right. good singing. good dancing. posting the eagle staff at this time. be shout out to larry harrison for taking care of our eagle staff. you maybe seated. calling up to the podium at this time michael lupdtin and vice president of the marketing and branding for this station. >> hi everyone. can you hear me? hello everyone. i am from kqmd and i wanted to welcome you to this eighth annual indian heritage celebration. we are honored to be honoring four heroes from the community who have tirelessly worked throughout the year to provide the kind of service that admissible media is about and engaged community and robust heritage is about. nominated by community leaders they have worked at the grass-roots level and share the highest values we all share. as a public supported media organization we are committed to this and in no
good points, and that was very typical of what i have known him to be as a servant at city college. it was very difficult in his position, often being the one vote out of seven, often finding rubber stamping of a decision, fighting the way we were spending our money for ten years. ten years he was in a position most of the time alone trying to speak up and say why are we doing this? we're running the college into the ground. this shouldn't be the way things should be, and when i got into the board and i concluded the same thing and i said "milton god bless you". i couldn't have been here for ten years and put up with this stuff ." and he just laughed and smiled and thank god he had been there for the people of san francisco for city college and more importantly the students of that institutionifieding that fight when no one really cared about what was happening over there. it was very easy not to care. i think that tells you something about a man, a son of privilege, fighting quietly for a decade for children who could never imagine such privilege. i think it tells you somet
that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same experience. as we do that, enhancing certain things. live stages have big-name bands. headlining the folsom street fair, people are now looking forward to our entertainmen
, of residence of san francisco had to endure the struggles and have made this city a very special place. i am very excited about the leadership that presides over san francisco today. mayor lee, supervisor chiu, mar, chu, and we had the treasurer. this ought to be a moment in which we celebrate the aspirations and the fact that we have risen to the governance of this country. the fact that we have changed the opportunity. last night, i have the opportunity to listen to an 86- year-old honoree at the gathering last night. she's had spoken about how her life was different and the opportunities that were denied because she was jewish. because of the efforts of norm and mike and your leade in, asiy are not denied opportunities because of where they come from. we are aspiring and we are leaving california and america in a new generation. -- leading california and america in a new generation. we have an obligation to lead in the 21st century. we are providing leadership in all areas that govern this country. technology, health, academia, commerce, art, entertainment, and government. today, we must
want to welcome you from the bay area, from all over the country to san francisco's city hall. today we honor and celebrate ambassador john christopher stevens in this civic celebration of his life. i thank the stevens family for hosting this celebration here. amongst his many friends, his family, his colleagues from around the world who continue to reremember and celebrate his distinguished life and sacrifice he made for all of us. while we have lost a true hero to our nation, his accomplishments and generosity lives on in all the places he that served, promoting mutual respect and cooperation in international relationships. ambassador stevens is an inspiration to all of us. i did something personally. i texted my daughters who also grew up in the bay area. they have always reminded me that they love being san franciscans. now as young adults they pride themselves in being world citizens. this is that place. san francisco and the bay area, where we have our attitudes and evolve ourselves to be not only great san francisco and bay area citizens but the inter national status of our city
looks like, basically it's a little clearer than that, it goes up on the wall, but it's the city laid out in these response districts. it shows you where all the emergency facilities such as hospitals and police stations and fire stations and schools are. basically, there's a map that corresponds with your neighborhood. you want to get one so you can find out where in your neighborhood to go. once you've taken care of your families, your friends, your pets, your loved ones if you want you can go help out other people in your city. there it is, a place for us to gather as nert members and there's our nert ics area. here is our structure. same kind of set up, sort of our version. command policy section, the planning group, they are up on top. then once things get rolling, you have your operations section, logistics section. here are our objectives on the nert team, figure out if it's big, if it's small, how do we keep track of what's going on? do we just remember it? are we going to rely on our computers, our pc's? no, we have to write it down the old-fashioned way. address, is the
side walls are. >> these are the spots you don't want to park. in the city there are a lot of spots like that. that's pretty common response -- my experience with driving. i was driving going hope. home i had to go 2 miles. it took 3 hours to drive 2 miles. it was my unwillingness to give up my car. i could have gotten out of my car and walked home. i'm driving i thought it would be easier if i had walked. on the freeway? this person out of his truck survived. he got out and waited for help. there are a lot of people who have certain skills will get to them. how about the bay bridge? if you have to drive after, drive slow. 5-10 miles per hour. look ahead to see if the roads are difficult to maneuver. even if you have a motorcycle it's hard to drive around this area. sometimes it's easy to walk than to drive off. the fifth, 11 people died, 6 were here. they were waiting for the family members to get off. it was by a masonry building with glass. have emergency supply kit. at least 3. one for home, work one for the car. emergency supply kit you want one for home you want for 5 days. ou
ago to reach out to folks in the city who do not have a bank account. we wanted to make sure they know they have options which should be more low-cost, more successful to them and using chat catchers. >> check cashing stores can be found all over the city, but they're convenient locations come with a hidden price. >> these are big. >> i remember coming in to collect -- charged a fee to collect a monogram. >> people who use check catchers, particularly those who use them to cash their paychecks all year long, they can pay hundreds, even a thousand dollars a year just in fees to get access to their pay. >> i do not have that kind of money. >> i would not have to pay it if i had a bank account. >> bank accounts are essential. they keep your money saved and that helps save for the future. most banks require information that may limit its pool of qualified applicants. encouraging to turn to costly and unsafe check captures. >> i do not feel safe carrying the money order that i get home. >> without a bank account, you are more vulnerable to loss, robbery, or theft. thankfully, the program wa
, working together for the city. i remember some of the crazy things we did growing up in political life. going to i think it's call -- i don't know if it's called the muni lot or parking lot and where the buss are in the morning so we could put a handout on every seat and bus that was there. i remember standing out in front of markets and it was raining and horrible and saying "will you vote for my dad" and milton loved this. he loved this energy and out of most of us and showed in what he ended up doing. all three kids learned at an early age giving to other people was one of the main things we were put on this world to do. our mom and dad taught us that. milton was a true believer sometimes to his detriment and would take on any power he needed to be even if it meant being fired from the board and "you're not doing enough. you're not raising enough money". he would take on anyone anytime if it was the right thing to do. he felt so strongly things needed to be resolved at city college and he never stop fighting after being diagnosed and surgery and he went to the meetings.
? this is a great, great honor to be here in city hall of san francisco. the person that nominated me for this award is laverne roberts. maybe some of you knew her as laverne morrisy. she went home to her reservation. she is piute and went to her home. where is her home? >> [inaudible] >> in earring ton nevada. we went there once and she has a beautiful house and live there is and now she is even running for the council of her tribe. laverne was going to surprise me and be here this evening, but she had an outbreak of one of her illnesses. her foot started to bleed and now she has to be on crutches for a while, so she had to turn in her plane ticket and her taxi fare, but otherwise she would have been here tonight and many of us know laverne and we would like to say a prayer that she gets better soon and can come and see us. this is for laverne. yes. please let's clap our hands for laverne. [applause] >> thank you. laverne roberts was honored here in this space two years ago. thank you laverne. and i think i can say a lot more about being indian and how much i am proud to b
in a real sense, as you have heard today, became his city. as it is with a deep sense of fate that in benghazi he and his colleagues gave that last full measure for his country and his many friends in the city where he died, continuing to defend and prosper their hopes and their aspirations for the future. many have commented since on chris's salient commitment to the people of benghazi. john thorn writing in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on
, as every city has. you certainly will not have any of those bankers wearing bowler hats and numberless. more to the point, london out is tremendously diverse. paris is becoming in admitting that it is more a diversity, and there's a little line for me quite hidden away the says i'm very much a parisian or i'm interested in parisian women, but not quite sure that i ever met a parisian woman. what do you mean by that? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of t
on tunnel avenue if you are a city resident you take it down there and show them you are a city resident and they will take it. call us. say, i can't get down there i have, they might come out with 50 gallon drums if you have waste or oil they will come and pick it up. if you have gasoline you haven't used in a while they will come and pick it up. the main thing is safety. we don't want to end up like this guy. he didn't heed the warnings. for each one of these to carry out this guy, how many guys are backing them up? i figure 4 a piece. we don't send in a team unless we have the same amount of people and then some to back them up. to get you to gage what an incident is the guy with the big thumb. the rule of thumb is this. if you cover the incident with your thumb you are far enough away. does it look like he's got it covered with his thumb? you see the smoke going to the side. he's still too close. he's got to back up further even with the rule of thumb. we want you to view the rule of time, distance and shielding. what's time, don't stick around. distance. get far away. shielding mean
to stop making t-12 bulbs. >> it is scheduled for extinction. >> along the same lines, the city of san francisco is considering an ordinance to require the conversion from the old 212 to t-8 efficiency fixtures or higher. >> there are discussions. many of the large owners have gone to retrofits because there is a very good payback on it. the only commercial buildings that haven't done that are the smaller buildings where there is not as much money involved. >> so what other energy-efficient leading do we see these days? >> in both residential and commercial applications, you're seeing a trend toward compact fluorescent bulbs where instead of the conventional edison-based socket. >> the edison base, the screw type socket. >> the standard screw-in socket that everybody uses. >> all are edison, right. >> now you're seeing pictures that have four-pin contact fluorescent bulbs. these are even more efficient -- they're approximately as fingerprint as a t-8. so they get about five times as much energy efficiency as a conventional light bulb. this goes into a special socket. you have to buy th
part is approval. and approval is something that's done at the local level here at the city of san francisco. we typically approve a listed product. like this kupling. occasionally we have somebody come forward saying, look, i have the listing. we say, that's great. but we don't allow to you use it here in san francisco. either the local law doesn't allow that kind of product or that kind of material, or we don't think it's safe. and i could give you some examples of that but basically 99% of the time we approve a list of products which has been tested, listed, and then approved by david or me. basically it's on behalf of the director of the department of building inspection. is that a good example? >> that's it. >> and day have i spends a lot of his time look at listings. tell us what this s. >> this is a cupling for electric metallic tubing. it's quite a large one. but the neat thing about this one is that it has a waterproof seal. it does not leak. this is a new advance in the industry. previously the fittings leaked and caused problems and now they're coming out with problems t
has something here that you guys can all use. different types of buildings are in the city. we have wood, unreinforced masonry, you have high rise and you have tilt ups. what's the safest construction type to be? four stories or less. wood? yeah, wood framed building. why is wood the safest building to be in, 4 stories or less? it flexes, yeah, it's flexible. what's the danger here? chimney, yeah, fireplace. be aware of the fact that just because it's a wood building and the event caused some sort of compromise of the structure of the building and the building is still standing doesn't necessarily mean there's not a danger there. so what could you as nert's do to make that situation better or at least keep it the same so no one else gets hurt? keep it off, yeah. keep people away. perfect. take out some of that yellow tape that you have, that yellow caution tape, and string it around around keep people back. in this particular case, what could you do to make that situation better? turn off the gas. where would you turn the gas off at? at the street, okay. that's a good place to do it
is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work i
helen diller. together with the clean and safe neighborhood parks fund and the city's general fund. >> 4. 3. 2. 1. [applause] >> the playground is broken into three general areas. one for the preschool set, another for older children, and a sand area designed for kids of all ages. unlike the old playground, the new one is accessible to people with disabilities. this brand-new playground has several unique and exciting features. two slides, including one 45- foot super slide with an elevation change of nearly 30 feet. climbing ropes and walls, including one
, maybe i would have one. >> it is going to be a great ceremony at city hall, look around, if you have been here you know what a beautiful honored spot we are in, if you have never been to this city hall, it is yours, come by some times, there are meetings going on and business happening but also celebrations of all kinds. tonight is one of those celebrations, we are going to be lighting the tree here at the top here. the beautiful tree of hope. and we have some more entertainment for you before we get to the program and a little bit more music and some of you are mildly singing along. no minds if you sing along as long as you know the words and sing. >> tammy hall, an accomplished key board artist and she is going to play for a little bit. tammy hall, everyone. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ applause ] . >> no wonder she is all over town, tammy hall on the electric piano. and let's add another mix to it, and we have a very talented vocalist who is also everywhere i see. i turn the paper and there she is, let's welcome veronica clout. >> thank you. [ applause ] ♪ ♪i can only give you love t
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